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Relocation in the news, November 2016

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http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/job-dissatisfaction-and-repeated-moves-across-country-causing-canadian-soldiers-to-quit-report-says

 

Job dissatisfaction and repeated moves to new locations across the country are the top reasons behind Canadian Forces personnel leaving the military, according to a report obtained by the Ottawa Citizen.

The examination of what prompts staff to leave comes as the Canadian Forces faces a shortage of soldiers and difficulties recruiting new personnel.

The briefing on retention of military staff, provided last year to Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Jon Vance, outlined the top reasons for those in uniform to leave.

A desire for “geographic stability” was the main reason, followed by “job dissatisfaction,” according to the briefing obtained by the Citizen under the Access to Information law. Other reasons included the need for more pay and benefits as well as military personnel having issues with senior or unit level leadership.

Brian J. Gavriloff / Edmonton Journal

Brian J. Gavriloff / Edmonton JournalNot only are soldiers quitting, but the Canadian Forces are finding it difficult to recruit new ones.

The briefing for Vance noted that at least 10,000 military personnel are moved in their jobs or relocated to another part of the country each year. Those moves come at a cost to taxpayers.

Having to deploy on military missions overseas was only mentioned by a small number of those surveyed as a reason for leaving.

Military personnel privately say that the upheaval caused by moving families regularly, as well as the isolated nature of some bases and the lack of job opportunities for spouses, make staying in uniform difficult.

Department of National Defence spokeswoman Suzanne Parker said the military is in the process of developing a revitalized strategy for retaining staff.

“It will ensure that retaining qualified and competent members in uniform is a fundamental aspect of how we manage our people,” Parker stated Monday in an email. “”We will review and adjust or develop policies, programs and activities as required that reflect the evolving needs of our members and their families while ensuring that we maintain our operational focus.”

It is not their choice where they have to go, so to they shouldn’t be paying for it and that’s where we see the unfairness that needs to be addressed

In January, a DND report tabled in the Commons outlined problems retaining staff and recruiting. The military has said it needs more than 4,000 new recruits each year just to offset attrition and keep 68,000 full-time troops in uniform.

But the January report noted that in 2015 the Forces was facing a shortage of nearly 1,900 regular force members and 5,300 reservists. That was because of higher than expected attrition and “challenges in meeting recruiting quotas” for reservists.

Military leaders have talked in the past about reducing the number of times personnel must relocate.

In 2013, then Canadian Forces ombudsman Pierre Daigle also raised the issue, noting his concern about the stress, financial or otherwise, being placed on military families by such moves.

Daigle recommended the military rethink how often it needed to transfer soldiers and uproot their families as part of its “operational requirements.” Moving staff every year is expensive for taxpayers and can impose major personal and financial hardships on military families, he noted.

“Why do we move people so much and how many times do we have to move?” Daigle said in a 2013 interview with the Citizen. “Yes, they need operational capacity and people have to be moved, but when they are moved for operational requirements, it is not their choice where they have to go, so to they shouldn’t be paying for it and that’s where we see the unfairness that needs to be addressed.”

Written by Major Marcus Brauer

November 2, 2016 at 20:11

I hope the recommendations are implemented before APS!

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Post by @DND_HEA.

Source: I hope the recommendations are implemented before APS!

Written by Major Marcus Brauer

March 1, 2016 at 23:36

Treasury Board’s interpretation of transparency described as “UNREASONABLE AND UNACCEPTABLE”

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4 1/2 years after systematically denying all applications for military relocation entitlements, cracks are beginning to show in the Treasury Board of Canada’s secret strategy to save money.

Source: Treasury Board’s interpretation of transparency described as “UNREASONABLE AND UNACCEPTABLE”

Written by Major Marcus Brauer

January 14, 2016 at 13:20

Scott Brison urged to take fresh look at real-estate dispute with soldiers Group of military members suing Ottawa over tens of thousands of dollars lost during moves By Richard Cuthbertson, CBC News Posted: Dec 30, 2015 12:03 PM AT Last Updated: Dec 30, 2015

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Written by Major Marcus Brauer

December 30, 2015 at 20:40

Scott Brison urged to take fresh look at real-estate dispute with soldiers Group of military members suing Ottawa over tens of thousands of dollars lost during moves By Richard Cuthbertson, CBC News Posted: Dec 30, 2015 12:03 PM AT Last Updated: Dec 30, 2015

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A Canadian soldier at CFB Halifax is urging Canada’s new Treasury Board president, Liberal MP Scott Brison, to take a fresh look at a dispute involving dozens of military members who suffered steep financial losses when forced to sell their homes.

The request comes as federal government lawyers are pushing ahead with their efforts to have the courts toss out a proposed class-action lawsuit launched on behalf of those members.

The members claim they are entitled to compensation under a federal home-equity assistance program after they were posted to new locations and sold their homes during local housing market downturns. Many lost tens of thousands of dollars.

Under the rules, a military member can receive 100 per cent compensation if they sell in a so-called depressed market. The dispute revolves around what is considered a depressed market and the lawsuit claims the Treasury Board, which ultimately controls compensation, is refusing to pay.

Major Marcus Brauer

Major Marcus Brauer has been with the Canadian Forces for 25 years. (CBC)

But as the proposed class action continues to grind through the courts, some of those involved are hoping the new Liberal government — and King-Hants MP Brison — will change the course.

“I would hope that Mr. Brison would look at the evidence before him,” says Maj. Marcus Brauer, a father of five who lost $88,000 when forced to sell his home in Bon Accord, Alta., after the military posted him to Halifax. He was only compensated $15,000.

“Instead of making soldiers go into court to get their entitlements, that they would follow the applicable policy in the way that it was intended so that soldiers wouldn’t have to suffer hardship when they’re posted every two to three years.”

Brauer has waged his own court battle against the federal government. Last year, a Federal Court judge ruled the Treasury Board was unreasonable in denying Brauer compensation, sending his case back to be considered a second time. Justice Richard Mosley even ordered the federal government pay Brauer’s legal costs.

Brauer, however, will be back in court again on Jan. 16 after the Treasury Board once again rejected his claims for compensation earlier this year.

Marcus Brauer house

Major Marcus Brauer lost $73,000 in his relocation from Bon Accord, Alta., to Halifax. (CBC)

Also making its way through the courts is a proposed class action lawsuit, launched by Master Warrant Officer Neil Dodsworth, who now serves at CFB Gagetown in New Brunswick..

He lost $72,000 when forced to sell his home in Morinville, Alta., after he was posted from CFB Edmonton to CFB Kingston by the Canadian Forces in 2009.

In October, a Federal Court judge turned down a bid by lawyers with the federal Justice Department, who said the proposed class action should be struck down because the policy is clear and there were no false statements made to personnel.

But the federal government quietly filed for an appeal last month and continues seek an order to strike the lawsuit.

“The way this is going, I believe they are just trying to … get more time,” Dodsworth said in an interview from his home in Oromocto, N.B. “In my view they’re just seeing if anyone bows out of this case.”

A spokesperson for the Treasury Board says it will not comment on the case as it is before the courts.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/scott-brison-military-home-equity-assistance-soldiers-1.3384287

Written by Major Marcus Brauer

December 30, 2015 at 17:57

Military Relocation Briefing Notes

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Recent Access to Information shows that the GOC knew the costs of living up to the military relocation policy, and did everything possible to delay and deny it.  Details and briefing notes available here.

 

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Written by Major Marcus Brauer

December 29, 2015 at 13:35

Federal Court date set (again) 19 January 2016 – OTTAWA

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Source: Federal Court date set (again) 19 January 2016 – OTTAWA

Written by Major Marcus Brauer

December 6, 2015 at 14:57

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